Ursula Le Guin On Beauty

Ursula Le Guin On Beauty

Ursula Le Guin Photographed by William Anthony

Ursula Le Guin Photographed by William Anthony

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I think of when I was in high school in the 1940s: the white girls got their hair crinkled up by chemicals and heat so it would curl, and the black girls got their hair mashed flat by chemicals and heat so it wouldn’t curl. Home perms hadn’t been invented yet, and a lot of kids couldn’t afford these expensive treatments, so they were wretched because they couldn’t follow the rules, the rules of beauty.

Beauty always has rules. It’s a game. I resent the beauty game when I see it controlled by people who grab fortunes from it and don’t care who they hurt. I hate it when I see it making people so self-dissatisfied that they starve and deform and poison themselves. Most of the time I just play the game myself in a very small way, buying a new lipstick, feeling happy about a pretty new silk shirt.

[…]

There’s the ideal beauty of youth and health, which never really changes, and is always true. There’s the ideal beauty of movie stars and advertising models, the beauty-game ideal, which changes its rules all the time and from place to place, and is never entirely true. And there’s an ideal beauty that is harder to define or understand, because it occurs not just in the body but where the body and the spirit meet and define each other.

 

- Ursula K. Le Guin

 

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Feature image by Benjamin Reed

Uniform Dressing: Pablo Picasso Edition

Uniform Dressing: Pablo Picasso Edition

Is Getting Dressed An Art Form?

Is Getting Dressed An Art Form?