Have You Seen HUMAN?

Have You Seen HUMAN?

On the flight to Paris, I watched a documentary called HUMAN that I hadn't so much as heard of. This isn't a total shock since I watch roughly 2 movies a year, but this kind of thing is more or less my precise cup of tea- how could I not know about it? I'm now left wondering if this was a big cultural thing that happened with its own moment and what not, and whether you have all already seen it?!?

HUMAN is a film by Yann Arthus-Bertrand in which he documents the experience of humanity through personal stories told by people looking straight into a camera, bearing a piece of themselves in the process. The filmmakers interviewed over 2,000 people in 60 countries by asking them the same 40 questions. There's no narration, and no attempt to have you draw any kind of conclusion. Of the motivation behind his film, Mr. Arthus-Bertrand says

I am one man among seven billion others. For the past 40 years, I have been photographing our planet and its human diversity, and I have the feeling that humanity is not making any progress. We can’t always manage to live together. Why is that? I didn’t look for an answer in statistics or analysis, but in man himself.

If you have seen it, let's discuss immediately (in the comments section below). If not, I could not recommend a better way to detox from the events that have unfolded over the last 20 days (yes, I'm counting and yes, IT'S ONLY BEEN 20 DAYS). Maybe wait for President Trump's next executive order, Betsy DeVos' official first day (maybe that was yesterday?), or don't wait at all and just watch on basically any run of the mill day in the new administration in which it appears that we human beings have lost any sense of a shared humanity. Luckily, there's a web version available on YouTube (links below) in three volumes, so this affirmation of the beauty of the human spirit is just a click away. 

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