Lynn Yaeger On Style

Lynn Yaeger On Style

I just bumped into Lynn Yaeger outside of the Louvre (did I just write that?!?!?) in the kind of cosmic fashion meeting one can only dream of. After collecting my positively star-struck self, I stopped her to say how much I admire her, and she was even more lovely than I could have imagined. The whole thing just about made my life. Then, on my walk home, I realized we haven't talked about Ms. Yaeger here, which changes now, with a few of her musings on style. May we all have the courage and creativity to be so authentically true to ourselves. 

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Photo: The Sartorialist

Photo: The Sartorialist

"I always wanted to look like you can’t really tell what these clothes are; maybe they’re old, maybe they’re cheap or maybe they cost a fortune. I wanted to have this mystery about it and not just wear the latest fashion trend. I would always try to have a signature expensive handbag so I didn’t just look like a nut if I was going to interview someone. People are afraid to be different, but authenticity really does give you a lot of confidence."

- via The Huffington Post

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Photo: Dietmar Busse, 2009

Photo: Dietmar Busse, 2009

"The gulf between the reality of my looks and the cultural ideal only widened when I began to work in the fashion industry. Early on, I decided to ignore the industry's dictates—so stifling, unattainable, judgmental—and make my own rules. I had long admired women with strong signature looks—Anna Piaggi, Diana Vreeland, Isabella Blow—for whom the fashion world seemed to make an exception. And I found myself reaching far outside the box for role models: to the women in Pre-Raphaelite paintings (those floaty clothes suited my physique far better than jeans and a T-shirt); to silent-movie heroines (their pale complexions were easy for me to replicate); even to Victorian dolls (whose round faces and rosebud mouths reminded me of me). 

- Via Oprah.com

 

Photo: The Coveteur

Photo: The Coveteur

“I had a very strong idea of how I wanted to look, always. When I was about eight, I didn’t look good in pants — I still don’t wear pants — so I told all the kids in the neighbourhood  we weren’t wearing pants anymore, we were only wearing dresses. I still dress like a [child] in a way. Sometimes I’ll see a little two-year-old on the street in a giant tutu and a funny sweater and polka-dot socks, and I’ll go, ‘There’s my look.’”

- Via The Business of Fashion 

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