Best of Milan Fashion Week Spring 2018

Best of Milan Fashion Week Spring 2018

The Spring 2018 ready-to-wear presentations are winding down next week in Paris. We've taken a look at the clothes coming out of New York and London and now Milan, where fashion week closed a few days ago. 

I loved so much of the clothing from Milan, but it was hard to pin down why. There was a spark of creativity across many of the collections, and a feeling of subtle innovation being discharged from the clothes. Yet, brands for the most part relied on the set of timeless principles, like tailoring and strong silhouettes, that make fashion good in the first place, and that have historically made Italian fashion great. 

Here's what I thought stood out from Milan Fashion Week. Also, it's worth noting how much the selections here overlap with what stood out for me from the Fall 2017 collections. Which, in and of itself, begs the question: in the course of six months, is it realistic to think our tastes could really change all that much?

 

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Attico

Yet again, I loved the entire collection, Attico to Z. If fashion is about tapping into the zeitgeist, then the founders of Attico, Giorgia Tordini and Gilda Ambrosio, have cracked the code. These clothes somehow feel like exactly what I want to be wearing right now (which is how they felt with the Fall collection as well). They're special but not stuffy and dressed up without being overdressed. And they feel so bursting with relevance. In my mind, I always wonder if something that feels so current can also simultaneously be timeless. It leaves me thinking: how will these clothes look in 5 years? 

Images: courtesy of Attico

 

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Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce & Gabbana stood out for me not because they did something with this collection that was wildly unexpected, but because they made such a rich statement on what modern femininity could look like. From a corseted ballgown to a classic smoking suit, modern femininity is not a silhouette, as it was in the 1950s, for example, but an attitude. That feels about as timeless and compelling a declaration as we can expect a collection of clothing to make. 

Images: Yannis Vlamos/Indigital.tv via Vogue

 

Marni

What an interesting collection of clothing! The nipping and exaggeration of the silhouette in, particularly around the waist, made me think about the power of proportion in our wardrobe. That the clothes maintained a feminine silhouette (narrow waist, wider hips) but didn't hug the body made me consider the relationship between fashion and fit and the relationship between our bodies and our clothes. 

Images: Kim Weston Arnold/Indigital.tv via Vogue

 

Antonio Marras

The clothes here felt so romantic and even otherworldly. Their etherealness was offset by something that felt very timely: at this moment in which we're living, I have been feeling as though we want our clothes to transport us. To infuse our lives with glamour. Maybe it comes back to the relevance of the escapist power of fashion and the utility of our clothing as a tool to help us find refuge from the challenges of daily life. 

Images: Kim WestonArnold/Indigital.tv via Vogue

 

And...

I enjoyed the bounded experimentation in certain collections like Brunello Cucinelli and Max Mara, houses that both have a well-established aesthetic. Within that, it was lovely to see creativity at play within limits. I particularly loved the feathery accents at Brunello Cucinelli. 

Images: Alessandro Burzigotti/Courtesy of Brunello Cucinelli via Vogue

...And speaking of feathers, I loved this green feathered number from Vivetta. And the shoes!!

      Image: Kim Weston Arnold via Vogue

    Image: Kim Weston Arnold via Vogue

    There was something so timeless about Luisa Beccaria's collection of floaty gowns accentuated with bright red lips. 

     Image: Marcus Tondo/Indigital.tv via Vogue

    Image: Marcus Tondo/Indigital.tv via Vogue

    And finally, this sage green and pink embroidered slip from Ermanno Scervino made my heart sing. 

     Image: Yannis Vlamos/Indigital.tv via Vogue

    Image: Yannis Vlamos/Indigital.tv via Vogue

     

    What stood out for you from Milan? 

     

     

    Feature collage by me, featuring photography from (L to R) Antonio Marras (Kim WestonArnold/Indigital.tv via Vogue), Luisa Beccaria (Marcus Tondo/Indigital.tv via Vogue), Vivetta (Kim Weston Arnold via Vogue) , Dolce and Gabbana (Yannis Vlamos/Indigital.tv via Vogue), and Attico (image courtesy Attico).

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