Best of London Fashion Week Fall 2018

Best of London Fashion Week Fall 2018

London Fashion Week, which came to a close last week (I'm behind!), produced a lot of good clothes. The questions that came up for me in New York are still relevant, but something about the collections in London consistently brings me back to the clothes (how they look! how they move!) and I start to ease into the fashion. And with so many designers making memorable clothing, it's not hard to do. Let's take a look, shall we?

 

Erdem

In an era of street wear and casual wear and everyday wear, I am grateful for designers like Erdem Moralioglu who still actively celebrate the art of dressing up. These designers are the ones whose work I'm instinctively drawn to; they are my heroes in fashion. Mr. Moralioglu displayed the breadth of his creative talent with a collection of pieces that ranged in its use of materials, cut, and silhouette, but still maintained a sense of cohesiveness. Beyond the beautiful clothing, accessories play an important role for Erdem. Gloves (which we've seen previously), but also lovely tulle pieces for the head and face which, to me, articulate the role that small details have in creating a compelling look.

Images: Yannis Vlamos / Indigital.tv via Vogue

 

 

Simone Rocha

I have included Simone Rocha in every London Fashion Week review I've written so far, and in this majestic place she's in creatively, I don't anticipate that stopping anytime soon. Rocha's collections speak to me because I want clothes in my closet, in my life, that take me places: emotionally, intellectually, spiritually. These clothes do that. Looking across her collections from the last few seasons, it's clear to see that Ms. Rocha has found her stride in juxtaposing materials, experimenting with shape, layering, and adding details in unexpected places. The result is clothes that are feminine and soft, yet strong and clearly articulated at once.

Images: Luca Tombolini / Indigital.tv via Vogue

 

 

Preen

Preen did it again for me this season with a collection of pieces that I instantly wanted to wear but wouldn't have known it before having seen these clothes. It was a curious thing that I most enjoyed experiencing. On reflection, the wearability of these clothes likely stems from attention to construction and tailoring, while the element of the unexpected arises from the way these clothes are layered, from the interesting details, and from the range of pieces included in the collection. And, oh, how I loved this deep red printed silk number. 

Images: Luca Tombolini / Indigital.tv via Vogue

 

 

Osman

The final collection that stood out for me was Osman. As I've thought about it, it isn't that any one piece stole my heart. In fact, I'm not sure the collection is entirely my style. Rather, I was struck by the fact that the collection, composed of an unusually wide range of clothing, was wonderfully representative of the wardrobe of a modern woman leading a modern life. A life which is full, which presents a diversity of obligations, which require a range of dress. Sequins were presented alongside a utility jumpsuit, work wear alongside playful clothes, frilly pieces and paired down ones. And isn't that, above all, the point of our clothes—props throughout the life course, whatever it may bring? 

Images courtesy Osman via Vogue

 

 

Notable mentions

This more-is-more take on print and layering courtesy of Toga.  

Images: Marcus Tondo / Indigital.tv via Vogue

 

Emilia Wickstead gave us this dreamy and delicate beaded gown. 

emilia-wickstead-london-fashion-week-fall-2018-rtw-1.jpg

Image: Luca Tombolini / Indigital.tv via Vogue

 

And these Fun-with-a-capital-F sequined pieces from Halpern. Don't even get me started on how much I love the middle look...all pants should come asymmetrical and with a mandatory side bustle. All of them. 

Image: Luca Tombolini / Indigital.tv via Vogue

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